Wide Awake Festival

Fri Jun 5 2020

12:00 PM

Brockwell Park

Norwood Road London SE24 9BJ

£37.95

Ages 18+

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WIDE AWAKE
A festival from Bad Vibrations, Dimensions, LNZRT and SC&P

LINE UP: 
ACROSS LEFTFIELD INDIE, POST PUNK, ELECTRONICA, TECHNO, JAZZ 

METRONOMY | BLACK COUNTRY, NEW ROAD
CHARLOTTE ADIGERY | SQUID 
THE MURDER CAPITAL | THE COMET IS COMING
 
PLUS - A Certain Ratio, Automatic, BEAK>, Faux Ferocious, Identified Patient, Manfredas b2b Ivan Smagghe, Pregoblin, Shortparis, Uranium Club, black midi, Boy Harsher, Charlotte Adigéry​, Crack Cloud, Daniel Avery, Drab Majestic, Dream Wife, Girl Band, Goat GirlLazarus KaneLos Bitchos, Lena Willikens, The Mauskovic Dance Band, Marie Davidson DJ, Minimal Violence, Proteus, Shame, Sheer Mag, ShortparisSnapped Ankles, Surfbort. 

ACCESSIBLE INFORMATION FOR THE FESTIVAL CAN BE FOUND ON THE FESTIVAL WEBSITE:-
https://wideawakelondon.co.uk/access/
 

Wide Awake Festival

  • Wide Awake

    Wide Awake

    Dance/Electronic

  • Metronomy

    Metronomy

    Electronic Pop

  • Black Country, New Road

    Black Country, New Road

    Alternative Rock

  • Squid.

    Squid.

    Kraut Rock

  • The Murder Capital

    The Murder Capital

    Alternative Rock

    James McGovern - vocals
    Damien Tuit - guitars
    Cathal Roper - guitars
    Gabriel Paschal Blake - bass
    Diarmuid Brennan - drums

    If you have ever seen The Murder Capital live then what will strike you most about the experience is not the heaviness, the bleakness or the rage you might expect, but witnessing a most extreme vision of tenderness. Their debut album, ‘When I Have Fears’, recorded over the Spring with Flood (PJ Harvey, Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, New Order etc.), embodies this tenderness; it is a purple bruise on the hard knee of the so-called post-punk resurgence. It is not a labour of love but a struggle through love, loneliness and grief that now sits weightless upon their five shoulders, not marching, but dancing, out into the cold light of day. It exists in two worlds which oppose each other yet breath each other’s air, because ultimately it is an album about accepting that which you fear, loving that which you hate, feeling the excess that can only be found in isolation. The name, ‘When I Have Fears’ acknowledges its own vulnerability, and was given very early on to ensure that consistency of thought, and that beautiful arch in the narrative which gives space for the purging of guilt and leads, ultimately, to its final cathartic moments.

    Listening to how many places opening track For Everything reaches sonically within the first ten seconds is representative of the album’s attempt to touch upon “the whole spectrum of human emotion”. The guitars, like saws, sing to each other, tenor and baritone; a chiming tambourine compliments even the methodical and angry deep-set drums. ‘Not at all, not for everything,/ It’s not for everything at all./ Not for everyone, it’s not for anyone at all,’ is so much more than just a smart, slick trick of the tongue, because the poetic and sonic landscape of which it speaks, and that which the whole album speaks, is both a mountain and a valley - it really becomes both everything and nothing.

    The music was secondary, and the ethos of compassion and ability to fully understand one another always came first. “The last time we played through the album we felt every second of those 6 months spent writing it and a lot of it is a reflection of what we went through together.” Just to hear Feeling Fades, to glimpse it, you immediately understand The Murder Capital’s insatiable need for unity and empathy both to banish and beautify the crux of loneliness. We hear that isolated voice searching out to sea, ‘And as the feeling fades away/ The tearing streets create a wave’: it lurches forward with uncertainty over the resounding bass that creeps slowly, slowly, and eventually catches up with a crack of those chugging drums. And suddenly we have union, we are there running alongside that voice, hand in hand. And, as everything falls in time and into place, we become acutely aware of the present, and that present which the voice sings of, ‘the now elapsed round you and me’, is no longer a lonely existence.

    You might be surprised to know that the debut album from that dark, twisted Dublin quintet, The Murder Capital, is in all its boyish innocence and vulnerability, a coming of age album. “When you get to your teens you begin to feel like you’re playing catch up with your inner child. You have to dismantle all the shit that was put into your parents brains and given to you.” A generational baggage handed to us perhaps not consciously, but by virtue of blood and guilt, as explained in More Is Less: ‘If I gave you what you wanted/ you’d never be full./ That’s the trappings of your boyish mind/ Become unshakeable”. Something as small as questioning why at six years old your hands were clasped in prayer, becomes a quiet revolution, “and we’ve tried to dismantle it in the fact that we've been completely honest in attempting to dismantle ourselves.”

    It is an attempt to hold a mirror up to emotion, to pain, which for this group is quite a specific pain; an unequivocal suffering as sharp as a shard of this reflective glass. But by focusing in on this struggle it comes undone, unanchored, deconstructed- but never diluted. It is simply allowed to float freely within the soundscape, where it may become transformed as another harnesses it. The same, but different- it is the cracked mirror. ‘Came home from somewhere,/ Somehow covered in myself./ Came home from nowhere,/ ‘Somehow now I’m someone else’ sings Slowdance I, with its intense reverb, drone-like bass and stinging atonal guitar. Its murky, anonymous and unsure compared to the elation of Slowdance II, and even though the tracks bleed into each other, you can sense it emerging from the pain, reborn as the cello sings and we enter the second half of the record.

    This relationship between pain and freedom is an important one. The suicide of a close friend led not only to the birth of the band’s name but to the philosophy of the entire record, “every single one of those lyrics relates back in some way to his death”. Discovering the work of photographer Francesca Woodman who took her own life at 22, was also a significant touch point. “The biggest impression her work left on us was relating to the loneliness of her photos. That sense of being completely on your own, but also taking solace in the beauty of the work as well. I think we’d be lying if we ever truly admitted to ourselves that we weren’t afraid of dying young. I think we push the boundaries at times. There’s something about Francesca Woodman’s work that just takes control of that.” Listening to Green and Blue, a track written immediately after discovering her work, you can hear that isolation as each instrument seems to exist entirely in a world of it’s own- so self aware. Lyrically too, its completely subjective. It's a song that can see only out of your eyes, it blurs the background and draws a thick black outline around the iris, gothic and indulgent.

    If this work inspires within us a sense of self-reflection and confrontation, then the album too came to realise itself, and in the most poignant way possible. One member buried his mum half way through recording, and so was born the dark grooves and tragic beauty of the record’s bravest track, Don’t Cling To Life. “Even through everything that was going on we didn’t want to write a sad song, we wanted to write a song you could dance to. Feeling grief and wanting to dance through it, and feeling the rawness and emptiness of our own grief, because any relationship that involves love is so specific to you.” And this quiet but violent contemplation will eventually lead you to the sobered ecstasy that we hear in the anti-chorus of Love, Love, Love. The final track’s words are weighted with their own importance, they are sure, and the instrumentation is round and whole and warm with the friction of the constant flitting snare, beating like a human heart. Love, fear, hate, grief: it is not the fact of these experiences but their uniqueness, that makes them universal. It is the knowledge that no one else is feeling how you feel, and yet you all find yourselves huddled round that same small dignified fire in the corner of the room at your darkest, coldest moments.

    When I Have Fears is not black and white, it is a unique experience that becomes universal simply through listening, tethered together by an unbreakable tenderness.

    Not black and white, but three anonymous bodies, cloaked and embracing in a pallid, grey-beige.
    It is everything and it is nothing.
    Shared by everyone and no one.
  • Beak>

    Beak>

    Progressive Rock

  • A Certain Ratio

    A Certain Ratio

    Post-Punk

  • Faux Ferocious

    Faux Ferocious

    Garage Punk

  • Manfredas

    Manfredas

    Dance/Electronic

  • Shortparis

    Shortparis

    Post Punk

  • black midi

    black midi

    Post-Punk

  • Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery

    Techno

  • Drab Majesty

    Drab Majesty

    Post-Punk

  • Dream Wife

    Dream Wife

    Indie Pop

  • Girl Band

    Girl Band

    Post-Punk

    Whilst Dublin 4 piece Girl Band’s cataclysmic sound avoids consignment to any singular genre, it’s thrusting noise-rock guitars, heavy techno drum beats and wailing vocals paired with frontman Dara Kiely’s witty, mundane and often surrealist lyrics create ‘as perfect an expression of rock’n’roll’s essential auto-destructive impulse as this writers ever heard.’ (The Guardian). Trailblazers for modern Irish alternative music and known for their ferocious live shows which have been described as chaotic, electrifying and ‘genuinely dangerous, like one last rave before the apocalypse’, Girl Band are not just a band, but a force.

    In 2015 they let loose their debut album Holding Hands With Jamie to rampant critical acclaim, and topping this was to be no easy feat, but following a 4 year hiatus, they returned in September with their second studio album, The Talkies, heralded as ‘one of the biggest comebacks of the year ‘ (Mary Anne Hobbs, 6Music.). The press landscape hailed it as ‘more abstract and more focused than their debut’ with outstanding reviews from the likes of Crack Magazine (9/10), The Irish Times (5*) and Record Collector(5/5). Thisled to a sold out East Coast and European tour which was highly intimate and intensely sought after, creating an air of ‘you had to be there’. Naturally, the band concluded this whirlwind comeback with two unrelenting, explosive shows at Dublin’s legendary Vicar Street, where Girl Band held their own as one of the most important bands to come out of Ireland in the last decade.
  • Goat Girl

    Goat Girl

    Garage Rock

  • Minimal Violence

    Minimal Violence

    House

  • Proteus 7

    Proteus 7

    World

  • Shame

    Shame

    Post-Punk

    Shame have been together just over three years and in that time have become the most viscerally thrilling new band in the UK.

    “South London’s Shame concoct a filthy mess of The Doors, Sleaford Mods and Pixies while intense singer Charlie Steen strips to the waist and beats himself with half a mic stand” – The Guardian

    Shame, five boys in a tornado…play rock, but with the patter of Streets, the spittle of Mark E. Smith, and the class of Johnny Marr but above all the frenzy, rage, exasperation of their age” – Les Inrocks

  • Sheer Mag

    Sheer Mag

    Punk

    Sheer Mag return with their sophomore album, A Distant Call. They’re still writing about surviving our current hellscape, but this time around, the politics get extra-personal. The album verges on being a concept piece, and the protagonist resembles frontwoman, Tina Halladay herself. The songs document a particularly alienating time in her life when she was laid off from a job. Broke and newly single, her father passed away, leaving her with more wounds than felt possible to heal.

    It’s heavy power-pop so sleek it gleams. “We’ve been waiting to write these songs since we started the band and we were able to take these experiences and build a story out of them,” Halladay says. A Distant Call makes an argument for socialism on an anecdotal level. We’re talking about how late capitalism alienates and commodifies whatever is in its path without using the term ‘late capitalism.’” Palmer and Halladay’s new approach to lyricism extended to the recording process, too. Once the Seely brothers had laid down the tracks, Halladay recorded vocals with producer Arthur Rizk (Power Trip, Code Orange).
  • Snapped Ankles

    Snapped Ankles

    Post-Punk

  • Surfbort

    Surfbort

    Post-Punk

  • The Comet Is Coming

    The Comet Is Coming

    Funk-Rock

    The Comet is Coming is the soundtrack to an imagined apocalypse.  In the aftermath of widespread sonic destruction what sounds remain? Who will lead the survivors to new sound worlds? Who will chart the new frontier?

    In a warehouse somewhere in London 2013 a meeting would take place between three musical cosmonauts. They would pool their energies to build a vessel powerful enough to transport any party into outer space.

    It is after the end of the world, the stage is a spacecraft, the mic is an accelerator, brace yourself for The Comet is Coming.

  • The Mauskovic Dance Band

    The Mauskovic Dance Band

    Cumbia

  • Charlotte Adigéry

    Charlotte Adigéry

    Ambient

  • Lazarus Kane

    Lazarus Kane

    Alternative

    No one is quite sure where the enigmatic Lazarus Kane emerged from. A US transplant now living in the UK, he appears a relic of some recent past. Armed with a drum machine and some old synthesisers, the music could be mistaken for something that might once have been heard coming out of CBGB’s decades ago. However, the songs tackle the everyday trappings of modern life; drinking too much, social media and the Kardashians.
  • Shortparis

    Shortparis

    Post Punk

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limit 10 per person
General Admission

£37.95 (£34.50 + £3.45 Fees, excluding any delivery costs)

Delivery Method

eTickets

Terms & Conditions

This event is 18 and over. Any Ticket holder unable to present valid identification indicating that they are at least 18 years of age will not be admitted to this event, and will not be eligible for a refund.

Wide Awake Festival

Fri Jun 5 2020 12:00 PM

Brockwell Park London
Wide Awake Festival

£37.95 Ages 18+

WIDE AWAKE
A festival from Bad Vibrations, Dimensions, LNZRT and SC&P

LINE UP: 
ACROSS LEFTFIELD INDIE, POST PUNK, ELECTRONICA, TECHNO, JAZZ 

METRONOMY | BLACK COUNTRY, NEW ROAD
CHARLOTTE ADIGERY | SQUID 
THE MURDER CAPITAL | THE COMET IS COMING
 
PLUS - A Certain Ratio, Automatic, BEAK>, Faux Ferocious, Identified Patient, Manfredas b2b Ivan Smagghe, Pregoblin, Shortparis, Uranium Club, black midi, Boy Harsher, Charlotte Adigéry​, Crack Cloud, Daniel Avery, Drab Majestic, Dream Wife, Girl Band, Goat GirlLazarus KaneLos Bitchos, Lena Willikens, The Mauskovic Dance Band, Marie Davidson DJ, Minimal Violence, Proteus, Shame, Sheer Mag, ShortparisSnapped Ankles, Surfbort. 

ACCESSIBLE INFORMATION FOR THE FESTIVAL CAN BE FOUND ON THE FESTIVAL WEBSITE:-
https://wideawakelondon.co.uk/access/
 

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

Ages 18+
limit 10 per person
General Admission
£37.95 (£34.50 + £3.45 Fees, excluding any delivery costs)

Delivery Method

eTickets

Terms & Conditions

This event is 18 and over. Any Ticket holder unable to present valid identification indicating that they are at least 18 years of age will not be admitted to this event, and will not be eligible for a refund.