Thu Nov 11 2021

5:00 PM

The Mill

29 Lower Trinity Street Birmingham B9 4AG

£19.80

Ages 14+

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Polaris: 10:15 - 11:00
Emmure: 09:15 - 09:55
Currents: 08:25 - 09:00
Spite: 07:40 - 08:10
Invent: 6:55 - 07:25
Gravemind: 06:10 - 06:40
Stepson: 05:30 - 05:55
Doors 05:00

Impericon Never Say Die Tour 2021

  • Polaris

    Polaris

    Metal

    When it came time to make their second album, The Death Of Me, Sydney metalcore outfit Polaris knew they had a tall order on their hands. Its predecessor, 2017 debut The Mortal Coil, was an ARIA-nominated, Top 10 hit in Australia, introducing the group to legions of fans around the country and, thanks to an extensive international touring schedule, the world.“We wanted to walk a line between maintaining what’s defined our band and brought people to our music in the first place, while trying to write for ourselves and keep ourselves interested,” begins drummer Daniel Furnari, one of the main songwriters in the unit. “Being our second full-length, we knew it was important for us to surprise the listener as well -nobody wants to hear the same record twice. We wanted to give them things they wouldn’t expect, but also for it to be definitively a Polaris record, building on what we’ve been working towards.”The tone was set early in the writing process when the first two songs the five-piece penned –the melodically charged “Masochist” and the feral, two-minute-40-second aural headbutt that is “Hypermania” –stretched the boundaries of their sound further than ever before. They set the course for an album that features some of the most bruising material Polaris have recorded –witness the churning, high intensity “Landmine” –and in the ’80s rock-infused “Martyr (Waves)”, some of their most melodic.Attuned listeners may also hear a palpable undercurrent of anxiety and paranoia in songs such as “Hypermania”. It stems not only from the pressure of following The Mortal Coil, but from the fact that while writing The Death Of Meeach member was coming to terms with their world being turned upside down by the success of their debut. After all, when Furnari co-founded Polaris in Southern Sydney in 2012 with vocalist Jamie Hails, guitarist Rick Schneider and bassist/vocalist Jake Steinhauser –lead guitarist Ryan Siew joined in 2013 –they spent thenext five years as a strictly local, underground concern. Now they’d been thrust into a life of international touring,
     
    complete with the euphoric highs of sold out shows and the crushing lows that happen in the silence that follows.Indeed in the two years since The Mortal Coil, Polaris embarked on three sold-out headlining tours of Australia, as well as supporting Architects and Parkway Drive around the country; five runs throughout Europe (including a series of arena shows supporting Architects and a slew of high-profile summer festival spots); three separate US tours; not to mention performing at the Download Festival and Unify Gathering in Australia. Somewhere in there, the quintet found time to write The Death Of Me.“We’d been cramming writing sessions in between tours since the middle of 2018,” advises Furnari, who even recalls writing riffs on his computer during one flight from Sydney to Amsterdam. The band tried a few new approaches to songwriting, with tracks such as the anthemic “Masochist” starting life as a vocal melody, around which the riffs were built, as opposed to the other way around. Elsewhere, influences outside the metalcore realm such as Southern Hardcore-riffing (“Hypermania”), 90s’ alt-rock (the phenomenally catchy “Vagabond”) and even melancholic pop (“Martyr (Waves)”) made their way into the music.When it came time to record, Polaris returned to the rental house in the small South Coast town of Mollymook where they made The Mortal Coil, converting it into a temporary studio. The familiar surrounds acted as something of a refuge after the high-pressure claustrophobia of touring.“The house is right on the edge of this huge cliff, and you just see endless ocean to the horizon when you wake up in the morning,” says Furnari.Accompanying the band was their Front Of House sound engineer, Lance Prenc, and longtime friend Scott Simpson (of Melbourne band Alpha Wolf), both of whom co-produced the album with the band.“Working with our live engineer and with a friend and being in a studio environment we chose and set up ourselves, there was a sense of freedom,” says Furnari. “We could take more time with the vocals to really get the best takes we could. I think people are going
     
    to hear the most powerful and unique vocal performances Jake andJamie have ever captured on record.”Having scheduled six weeks for the recording, come the end of that period the band realised the songs needed further finessing.“We started to get honest with ourselves and realise there was so much more to be done,” says Furnari. “We were going to walk out of there with an album that wasn’t up to the standard we wanted it to be.”In between more shows throughout Europe, Australia and New Zealand, the band spent two stints in Melbourne tracking drums at Range Master Studios, and additional vocals and guitars at their engineers’ respective home studios.“It was very intense, back-and-forthing between tours and the studio over those couple of months, but it was also really exciting because we knew we were giving ourselves the time and opportunity to make something we would be really proud of,” says Furnari.As the main lyric writer in Polaris, Furnari warns that The Death Of Mecontains some of the bleakest material he’s ever penned, with recurring lyrical motifs and ideasfloating throughout.“There is a kind of arc to the lyrics that takes you across the record,” he starts, while stressing that The Death Of Meisn’t a concept album. “It’s a record about losing faith in yourself and the world, and finding it again temporarily before losing it once more. It’s this cycle of ups and downs and highs and lows and victory and defeat again and again, struggling to find balance in our lives and within ourselves.“Writing from a place of pain and struggle is a part of who we are as a band. And in contrast to our earlier stuff, I no longer feel pressured to provide some kind of solution. I’ve just learned to be okay with saying, ‘This is how I felt at that time.’”Such lyrical layers complement the expansive nature of the music, resulting in an album that adheres to the band’s initial vision: it’s distinctly the work of Polaris, but reflects the experiences and growth of the past two years.“We’ve experienced more of the world and gone out of our comfort zone, and I think that’s audible in the music,” says Furnari. “I think a
     
    lot of things people enjoyed about The Mortal Coilwe’ve managed to retain, but I don’t think we could have thought of a lot of this stuff two years ago.”Polaris have since gone on to receive their second ARIA nomination in the category of “Best Hard Rock/Heavy Metal Album”, and were announced in September as the winners of the 2020 Heavy Music Award for Best International Breakthrough Band
  • Emmure

    Emmure

    Metal

    For a generation of malcontents and outsiders desperate for that extra bit of adrenaline, just to make it through another day, the unrivaled ability of Frankie Palmeri to flip his middle fingers at the world (and himself), with equal bravado and passion, has made EMMURE essential listening. Frankie doesn’t mince word onstage or off and EMMURE albums are as allergic to complicated metaphors as they are filled with unrelenting, savage and catchy beatdowns. HINDSIGHTreunites the band with producer WZRD BLD, aka Drew Fulk (Dance Gavin Dance, Motionless In White, Bad Wolves), who produced their career redefining 2017 album for SharpTone, Look At Yourself.EMMURE’s confrontational spirit and irresistible hooks won them fans on Rockstar Mayhem, Warped Tour, Knotfest, countless festivals, and on tour with a diverse range of bands that includes Five Finger Death Punch, Killswitch Engage, As I Lay Dying, and co-headliners Whitechapel. Across eight albums -like the genre classics Speaker of the Dead(2011), and Eternal Enemies(2014) –EMMURE battled their way into the extreme music scene like uninvited but necessary guests.
     
    The band’s moniker references“immurement,” a particularly brutal form of executionwhere a person was trapped behind wallsand simply left to die. EMMURE has defied all death sentences, however, from without and within. And while they’ve never been one to court awards or accolades, the fact that heavy metal tastemaker Loudwireput them alongside iconoclastic troublemakers GG Allin and Marilyn Manson in a list of 10 Bands That Didn’t Care If You Hated Them, just before the release of Hindsight,was exactly the kind of press to earn Frankie’s retweet.Tenacious, raw, and uncompromising in a sea of fakery, EMMURE proudly stands apart.
  • Currents

    Currents

    Metal

    CURRENTS is the new standard for death-infused metalcore. This is emotionally fraught and impossiblyangry music soaked in cold, depressive atmosphere. CURRENTS explore the forbidden realms of atortured psyche, searching for meaning amidst uncertain chaos and venom.Heartache, physical abuse, abandonment, trauma – no dark emotion is spared examination. CURRENTSalso turn their gaze outward, offering no mercy to man-made catastrophes like climate change and animalabuse. An exploitative system that inflicts such harm upon humanity and the entire world will not bespared the wrath within this explosive, weaponized bombast.The Way It Ends​, the second full-length from the Connecticut bruisers, is a thematic and spiritualsuccessor to their dense, bludgeoning, and smartly constructed full-length debut, ​The Place I Feel Safest(2017), and a direct follow-up to the blistering and diverse EP, ​I Let The Devil In​ (2018).Those well-versed in Meshuggah, Humanity’s Last Breath, Vildhjarta, and Architects have embracedCURRENTS with full-throated passion. A combination of their contemporaries and influences, channeledthrough unique perspective and personal experience, resulted in something revolutionary. It’s why theywere handpicked for tours with August Burns Red, As I Lay Dying, We Came As Romans, Fit For AKing, Born Of Osiris, and the Impericon Never Say Die! Tour.As ​New Noise​ declared: “CURRENTS is a band not to be ignored.”
  • Spite

    Spite

    Metal

    When harnessed in proper fashion, anger unites. Spite attract outsiders together by way of a hypnotic, heavy vengeance bordering on thrash intricacy and deathcore intimacy.As a result, the Northern California quartet—Darius Tehrani [vocals], Lucas Garirrigues [guitar], Alex Tehrani [guitar],Ben Bamford [bass],and Cody Fuentes [drums]—engender a level of devout fandom that can only be categorized in canonical terms...“‘Spite Cult’is how we refer to the union between ourselves and the fans,” says Darius. “It’s the opposition, the outcasts, and the rejects of society coming together. They’re embracing who they are and not just doing what they’re told. We’re letting people know it’s okay to be angry. We’ve never had a filter on our lyrics. There’s no limit on what we might say or how deep the music will go.”The group’s willingness to push the envelope quietly transformed them into one of modern heavy music’s most intense forces.Following 2016’s self-titled Spite, the musicians registered shockwaves onthe Richter Scale with Nothing is Beautifula year later. Tallying over 5 million-plus cumulative on-demand streams, “Kill or Be Killed” notably racked up over 1 million Spotify streams and just shy of 1 million YouTube views. The band destroyed stages coast-to-coast alongside everyone from Attila and Oceano to Carnifex, Whitechapel, and Winds of Plague. Along the way, four-pieceprepared their most incisive statement to date in the form of their third full-length, Root of All Evil[Stay Sick Recordings]. This time around, they turned the anger outward, railing against everything.“Nothing is Beautiful stemmed from depression and self-hatred,” he explains. “We’ve shifted focus. Root of All Evilis based on outward anger towards everyone else rather than atoneself. We’re embracing the dark side.”Spite introduce this vitriolic assault with the high-speed and hard-hitting “Reign In Hell.” Tapping into a metallic side, the single ignites a fire that never stops burning, slipping from blast beats and breakdowns towards a head-spinning hookand provocative theme. Meanwhile, the title track sums up the mission statement.“‘The Root of All Evil’is about embracing the darkness that swells in your core and going through with your sinister urges,” he goes on, “No help to seek, no God above, no happy ending. While others attempt to pick up the pieces of a failing society, you thrive in the negativity, the hatred, and the violence.”In the end, Spite gives their cult a soundtrack with Root of All Evil.“We want to take it to the next level,” he leaves off. “We want you to be gripping your seat from the first track until the very end. We hope you feel those waves of anger and hatred and know it’s alright to feel like that.”
  • Invent Animate

    Invent Animate

    Metal

    Invent Animate (previously stylized as Invent, Animate) is an American metalcore band from Port Neches, Texas. The band formed in late 2011 and self-released their debut EP titled Waves on March 13, 2012. After a number of regional tours and increasing popularity in the online djent community, the band was signed up by Tragic Hero Records in February 2014. The band announced they would release their debut full-length record titled Everchangeron August 26, 2014. Their sophomore album Stillworld was released on July 8, 2016. Their third album and first with Marcus Vik, Greyview, was released on March 13, 2020
  • Gravemind

    Gravemind

    Metal

    Relentlessly heavy, uncompromisingly honest, Gravemind are a five-piece force to bereckoned with. Their debut album Conduit, which debuted at #30 on their national charts is currently taking the Australian metal scene by storm, whilst growing a steady internationalfollowing.Never one to do things in halves, Melbourne metal entrepreneurs Gravemind teased their upcoming album in a way their fans have come to expect. Via their (at the time unannounced) new home Greyscale Records. First came the cypher, then the clues, and now both the band and label are proud to announce Gravemind joining the Greyscale family, and announcing their debut album Conduit which is out now. This album has been an intense labour of love that was over two years in the making, but vocalist, Dylan Gillies-Parsons unpacks the experience as a necessary means to an end. “We wanted to take our time with this record. It had to be as close to perfect as possible, and it needed to accurately reflect who we were, and what we felt as individuals. This album is our reveal, it is the truth as wesee it, in all it’s forms”triple j's The Racket premiered the intense first single Volgin; an ode to chasing what deep down we know we are truly made for, to listen to the very things everything in life tells us to ignore. “Volgin is about being alone in the way you see the world. Instead of finding ways to pacify yourself, or conform to others beliefs; it’s about going against the grain, in search of meaning.No matter how much it hurts, no matter how alone you feel, it’s about realising your true potential by doing the one thing we so rarely do -listen to what your soul is telling you”.
  • Stepson

    Stepson

    Metal

    Stepson -Brisbane's most high-octane punk/hardcore outfit, are the first Australian band that Sharptone Records have signed for the world. Their debut album 'Help Me Help You' (out early 2021 was produced, mixed and mastered by Callan Orr of Avalanche Studios (Dream On Dreamer, Young Lions, Hands Like Houses). There isn't a more exciting and innovative hardcore/punk band out of Australia in 2020. Stepson are Brock Alan Conry on Vocals, Nick Bennett on Guitars, Jayden Ridley on Bass & Vocals, Jordan McDonald on Drums and Robert Suthernon Guitars.Stepson pride themselves on having high energy, honest lyrics and emotive music. Kicking everything off in 2014, Stepson have gathered an amazing following around Australia through hitting the road and playing every show they could, and always having time to meet fans. 2015 saw them release their sophomore EP titled ‘Echoes In An Empty Room’, 2016 producedone single (Never Mind Me) and a 3-track EP (The Beautiful Lie) and in 2017, they dropped single Come With Me. They then spent their time honing their unique blend of sounds to write what was to become 'Help Me Help You.'Along the way, Stepson has been given the chance to share a stage with acts such as Polaris, In Hearts Wake, I Prevail, While She Sleeps, Counterparts, Stray From The Path, Ocean Grove and Hellions among many other established acts & now turn their sights overseaswith listeners all around the world excited to see what the young Aussie's have to offer.

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limit 10 per person
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£19.80 (£18.00 + £1.80 Fees, excluding any delivery costs)

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This event is 14 and over. Any Ticket holder unable to present valid identification indicating that they are at least 14 years of age will not be admitted to this event, and will not be eligible for a refund.

Impericon Never Say Die Tour 2021

Thu Nov 11 2021 5:00 PM

The Mill Birmingham
Impericon Never Say Die Tour 2021

£19.80 Ages 14+

Polaris: 10:15 - 11:00
Emmure: 09:15 - 09:55
Currents: 08:25 - 09:00
Spite: 07:40 - 08:10
Invent: 6:55 - 07:25
Gravemind: 06:10 - 06:40
Stepson: 05:30 - 05:55
Doors 05:00

Please correct the information below.

Select ticket quantity.

Complete the security check.

Select Tickets

Ages 14+
limit 10 per person
General Admission
£19.80 (£18.00 + £1.80 Fees, excluding any delivery costs)

Delivery Method

eTickets
Box Office Collection

Terms & Conditions

This event is 14 and over. Any Ticket holder unable to present valid identification indicating that they are at least 14 years of age will not be admitted to this event, and will not be eligible for a refund.